DISC Lecture Series: Using Social Pressure to Get-Out-the-Vote by Chris Larimer

Date: 
January 13, 2011 - 17:20 - 19:10
Building: 
Nador u. 9, Monument Building
Room: 
203
Event type: 
Event audience: 

 

Chris Larimer,  an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Northern Iowa, will give a lecture on 'Using Social Pressure to Get-Out-the-Vote'. Professor Larimer's research has followed three distinct tracks: 1) the use of field experiments to study voting behavior, particularly the effect of social pressure/social norms on voter turnout, 2) the use of laboratory experiments to study people's attitudes toward government decision makers, as well as the interrelationship between gender and leadership traits, and 3) state public policy and public administration theory.  Professor Larimer recently received a National Science Foundation grant with Rebecca Hannagan of Northern Illinois University to study the effects of gender balance legislation on decision making in local boards and commissions.
ABSTRACT:
More than a dozen recent experimental studies have demonstrated that voters are much more likely to vote when told that who votes is public information, particularly when they believe that their voting record is likely to be revealed to others in their household or neighborhood.  However, in order to understand the effects of social pressure, it is also important to examine instances where social pressure interventions fail to produce substantial effects on voter turnout.  This talk will provide an overview of published and unpublished research, calling special attention to several instructive experiments where social pressure does and does not generate marked effects. 

Chris Larimer, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Northern Iowa, will give a lecture on 'Using Social Pressure to Get-Out-the-Vote'. Professor Larimer's research has followed three distinct tracks: 1) the use of field experiments to study voting behavior, particularly the effect of social pressure/social norms on voter turnout, 2) the use of laboratory experiments to study people's attitudes toward government decision makers, as well as the interrelationship between gender and leadership traits, and 3) state public policy and public administration theory.  Professor Larimer recently received a National Science Foundation grant with Rebecca Hannagan of Northern Illinois University to study the effects of gender balance legislation on decision making in local boards and commissions.

ABSTRACT:

More than a dozen recent experimental studies have demonstrated that voters are much more likely to vote when told that who votes is public information, particularly when they believe that their voting record is likely to be revealed to others in their household or neighborhood. However, in order to understand the effects of social pressure, it is also important to examine instances where social pressure interventions fail to produce substantial effects on voter turnout.  This talk will provide an overview of published and unpublished research, calling special attention to several instructive experiments where social pressure does and does not generate marked effects.