DISC Lecture Series: "“Successful” Power Sharing? Normative Justifications, Formal Procedures and Empirical Outcomes of Institutional Design in post-Conflict Kosovo" by Artak Galyan

Date: 
December 1, 2011 - 17:40 - 19:10
Building: 
Nador u. 9, Faculty Tower
Room: 
808
Event type: 
Event audience: 
DISC Lecture Series: "“Successful” Power Sharing? Normative Justifications, Formal Procedures and Empirical Outcomes of Institutional Design in post-Conflict Kosovo" by Artak Galyan

Artak Galyan, doctoral candidate at the Central European University will give a talk on “Successful” Power Sharing? Normative Justifications, Formal Procedures and Empirical Outcomes of Institutional Design in post-Conflict Kosovo. Please find the abstract of the upcoming talk below.

Abstract: The use of power sharing has been normatively justified throughout the post-conflict institutional development of Kosovo. It was argued that implementation of a complex of institutions that will share political power among all the significant ethnic groups will reconcile the warring sides, prevent future violence among the antagonized ethnic groups and to offer an alternative to ethnic partitioning of Kosovo. Moreover, throughout 1999-2008 these requirements were formally fulfilled, and provided to a various degree for the core power sharing principals: proportional representation, segmental autonomy, grand coalition and minority veto. Finally, with certain reservations one could argue that the power sharing regimes put in place achieved their expected outcomes and provided for a system of governance shared among all the significant ethnic groups, providing each of the groups a considerable representation, and even overrepresentation at all levels of governance. What has however been ambiguous or at least empirically not investigated is whether power sharing contributed to the intergroup reconciliation, development of trust towards the state and its representative institutions, assured the loyalty of all the significant ethnic groups towards the sovereignty of the state. Using survey data from UNDP’s Early Warning Reports this paper explores the success of implementation of power sharing in Kosovo. In particular, the paper contrasts the normative justification for the use and the extent of fulfillment of power sharing principles with the success of power sharing in reconciling ethnic groups, decreasing animosity among them and developing attachment to the state and its institutions.