The Populist Radical Right in Central-Eastern Europe

Date: 
March 18, 2013 - 17:30 - 19:10
Building: 
Nador u. 9, Monument Building
Room: 
Gellner Room
Event type: 
Event audience: 
Presenter(s): 
Andrea L.P. Pirro
Presenter(s): 
Péter Krekó
CEU contact person: 
Carsten Q. Schneider
Phone: 
+36-1-327-3086
E-mail: 
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Website: 
DISC

The recent electoral performance of populist radical right parties seems to confirm the pervasive appeal of this party family also in Central and Eastern Europe. Unlike their Western counterparts, these parties do not stem from a ‘silent counter-revolution’; populist radical right parties in the region retain features sui generis, partly in relation to their historical legacies and the idiosyncrasies of the post-communist context.

The discussion on the imperfections on democracies focuses on the supply-side (parties) and demand-side (voters) of populist radical right politics. The first part draws on the Bulgarian Ataka, Hungarian Jobbik, and Slovak SNS, and discerns commonalities and differences in the ideology of this party family in Central and Eastern Europe. The second part overviews the demand for right-wing radicalism in the region and then focuses on Hungary and Jobbik voters; relying on traditional survey and Facebook data, the analysis refutes some widespread beliefs about the nature of radical right voting.

Andrea L. P. Pirro is Ph.D. Candidate at the Centre for the Study of Political Change (CIRCaP), University of Siena and currently a DISC research fellow. His research project focuses on the emergence and electoral performance of alleged populist radical right parties in Central and Eastern Europe. His research interests include radical right parties and politics, populism, social and political change in Europe. He has a number of forthcoming contributions in peer-reviewed journals (e.g. Government and Opposition) and edited volumes. 

Péter Krekó is Director of Political Capital and Assistant Professor at Eötvös Loránd University. His main research interests include the demand for radical right politics and the psychology of conspiracy theories. He is author of numerous studies and articles on the radical right and the demand for right-wing radicalism, and regularly comments in domestic and international media on these issues.

Chair: Zsolt Enyedi, Department of Political Science, DISC, CEU